Revolution

Final Countdown

Global inflation has begun : the elites tremble before the wrath of the dupes

Deutscher Text  /  Μετάφραση στα ελληνικά Italiano

The dramatic collapse of young economies in the world are the first signs announcing the crash of the world financial system. The debt tsunami is rolling . It will lead to an inflation of anger against those whose goal is the exploitation of the world. The end will be painful, says Marc Faber. Christine Lagarde speaks about the breaking of a dam, against which defense lines need to be built up. But the attackers act in self-defense;  millions of people are starting to rebel against the financial system. The situation is changing.

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Caption: Revolutions always break out when those in power believe that they can lever a piece of bread into a piece of cake ( leverage). The storming of the Bastille  in 1793 , Charles Thévenin .

The alchemists of the global financial system start getting nervous. (more…)

Endspiel ! Globale Inflation hat begonnen: Die Eliten zittern vor dem Zorn der Betrogenen

Το ύστατο παιχνίδι ! Άρχισε ο παγκόσμιος πληθωρισμός : Οι ελίτ τρέμουν την οργή των εξαπατημένων

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Die dramatischen Zusammenbrüche in den jungen Volkswirtschaften der Welt sind Vorboten für den Crash des Weltfinanzsystems. Der Schulden-Tsunami rollt an. Er wird zu einer Inflation des Zorns gegen jene führen, die sich die Ausbeutung der Welt zum Ziel gemacht haben. Das Ende wird schmerzhaft sein, sagt Marc Faber. Christine Lagarde spricht vom Dammbruch, gegen den Verteidigungs-Linien errichtet werden müssen. Doch die Angreifer handeln aus Notwehr: Millionen Menschen beginnen, gegen das Finanzsystem zu rebellieren. Die Lage (more…)

Hordur Torfason : A message for Greeks and all peoples.

Ένα μήνυμα του Ισλανδού Χόρντουρ Τόρφασον για τον ελληνικό λαό – και για όλους τους λαούς.

Ο Hordur Torfason. This is the man who started a revolution in Iceland, which forced the government to resign and made the IMF representatives run out of his country. His talks about what he and the people of Iceland did and send a message to all european (and not only) peoples.

Ο Χόρντουρ Τόρφασον είναι ο άνθρωπος που άρχισε την επανάσταση στην Ισλανδία, που ανάγκασε την κυβέρνησή της να παραιτηθεί και τους εκπροσώπους του ΔΝΤ να φύγουν τρέχοντας από τη χώρα. Λέει τι έκανε ο ίδιος και ο λαός της Ισλανδίας και στέλνει μήνυμα στους λαούς της Ευρώπης (και όχι μόνο).

Torfason,

50 Truths about Hugo Chavez and the Bolivarian Revolution

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President Hugo Chavez, who died on March 5, 2013 of cancer at age 58, marked forever the history of Venezuela and Latin America.

1. Never in the history of Latin America, has a political leader had such incontestable democratic legitimacy. Since coming to power in 1999, there were 16 elections in Venezuela. Hugo Chavez won 15, the last on October 7, 2012. He defeated his rivals with a margin of 10-20 percentage points.

2. All international bodies, from the European Union to the Organization of American States, to the Union of South American Nations and the Carter Center, were unanimous in recognizing the transparency of the vote counts.

3. James Carter, former U.S. President, declared that Venezuela’s electoral system was “the best in the world.”

4. Universal access to education introduced in 1998 had exceptional results. About 1.5 million Venezuelans learned to read and write thanks to the literacy campaign called Mission Robinson I.

5. In December 2005, UNESCO said that Venezuela had eradicated illiteracy.

6. The number of children attending school increased from 6 million in 1998 to 13 million in 2011 and the enrollment rate is now 93.2%.

7. Mission Robinson II was launched to bring the entire population up to secondary level. Thus, the rate of secondary school enrollment rose from 53.6% in 2000 to 73.3% in 2011.

8. Missions Ribas and Sucre allowed tens of thousands of young adults to undertake university studies. Thus, the number of tertiary students increased from 895,000 in 2000 to 2.3 million in 2011, assisted by the creation of new universities.

9. With regard to health, they created the National Public System to ensure free access to health care for all Venezuelans. Between 2005 and 2012, 7873 new medical centers were created in Venezuela.

10. The number of doctors increased from 20 per 100,000 population in 1999 to 80 per 100,000 in 2010, or an increase of 400%.

11. Mission Barrio Adentro I provided 534 million medical consultations. About 17 million people were attended, while in 1998 less than 3 million people had regular access to health. 1.7 million lives were saved, between 2003 and 2011. (more…)

Hugo Chavez was a democrat, not a dictator, and showed a progressive alternative to neo-liberalism is both possible and popular

If you want to learn about human rights in Venezuela before Hugo Chavez, type “Caracazo” into Google, and do so with a strong stomach. Back in 1989, then-President Carlos Andrés Pérez won an election on a fiery platform of resisting free-market dogma: the IMF was “a neutron bomb that killed people, but left buildings standing,” he proclaimed.

But after safely making it to the presidential palace, he dramatically u-turned, unleashing a programme of privatisation and neo-liberal shock therapy. With gas subsidies removed, petrol prices soared, and impoverished Venezuelans took to the streets. Soldiers mowed protesters down with gunfire. Up to 3,000 perished, a horrifying death toll up there with the Tienanmen Square Massacre – in a country with a population 43 times smaller.

It was his abortive coup attempt against Pérez’s murderous, rampantly corrupt government in 1992 that launched Chavez to prominence. Though locked away, Chavez became an icon for Venezuela’s long-suffering poor. By the time he won a landslide victory in 1998 on a promise to use the country’s vast oil wealth to help the poor, Venezuela was a mess. Per capita income had collapsed to where it had been in the early 1960s. One in three Venezuelans lived on less than $2 a day. Oil revenues were squandered.

Over the coming days, you will be repeatedly told that Hugo Chavez was a dictator. A funny sort of dictator: there have been 17 elections and referenda since 1998. Perhaps you think they were rigged. When he won by a huge margin in 2006, former US President Jimmy Carter was among those declaring he had won “fairly and squarely”. (more…)

Inside the Revolution: A Journey into the Heart of Venezuela

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February 2009 marked 10 years since Hugo Chavez took office, following a landslide election victory, and launched his revolution to bring radical change to Venezuela. While wildly popular with many in the country, Chavez’s policies and his strongly-worded criticisms of the U.S. government have also made him powerful enemies, both at home and abroad, especially in the media.

Filmed in Caracas in November 2008, on the eve of the 10th anniversary of Chavez’s controversial presidency, this feature-length documentary takes a journey into the heart of Venezuela’s revolution to listen to the voices of the people driving the process forward.

The film traces the recent history of Venezuela, before and after the election of Hugo Chavez to the presidency, using archive material and interviews with Venezuelans living in the barrios of Caracas who are involved in community and social movements. The achievements and challenges facing the Bolivarian process are put into context by means of interviews with leading Venezuelan social scientists Edgardo Lander and Javier Biardeau, as well as the Canadian economist Michael Lebowitz, who currently lives in Venezuela.

“This is a rare film about Venezuela, a country in extraordinary transition. Watch this film because it is honest and fair and respectful of those who want to be told the truth about an epic attempt, flaws and all, to claim back the humanity of ordinary people.”

– John Pilger (Journalist, author and documentary filmmaker)

“A lively, well-researched documentary which pulls off that most difficult of tasks – an honest account of the achievements and the weaknesses of the Chavez government.”

– Sue Branford (Journalist, former Latin American analyst for the BBC World Service)